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PROJECT: THE BLACK MONEY SCAM OR THE WASH-WASH SCAM

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The "Black Money Scam," also known as the "Wash-Wash Scam," is a common type of

advance fee fraud that preys on victims' desire for easy money. 


Please read our previous projects for more context:

 

MODUS OPERANDI:


  • Initial Contact: 

    • The scam usually begins with an unsolicited email, letter, or social media message from a fraudster posing as a wealthy individual, government official, or businessman from a foreign country.

    • The fraudster claims to have access to large sums of money that need to be laundered or cleaned because they were dyed or marked illegally. 

    • The fraudster often promises the victim a share of the money in exchange for their assistance.

  • Demonstration of "Black Money": 

    • To lend credibility to their story, scammers may show the victim stacks of genuine currency notes dyed black or covered with a substance that appears to be "marked" or "stained."

    • They claim the money can only be restored to its original form through a unique chemical process.

  • Request for Assistance: 

    • The scammer then asks the victim to provide upfront funds to purchase the supposed "cleansing" chemicals or to cover fees associated with transferring or transporting the money.

    • They may promise high returns on investment or a substantial portion of the recovered funds once the process is complete.

  • Continuous Requests for Money: 

    • Once the victim agrees to participate, the scammer may continue to request additional payments for various reasons, such as unexpected fees, taxes, or legal expenses.

    • They use excuses to delay the completion of the transaction and keep the victim hooked.

  • Disappearance: 

    • After extracting as much money as possible from the victim, the scammer disappears, leaving the victim with worthless or counterfeit currency and significant financial losses.

 

RED FLAGS:


  • Unsolicited Contact: 

    • Be wary of unsolicited emails, letters, or messages from individuals claiming to have lucrative business opportunities, especially if they involve large sums of money or promises of quick riches.

  • Pressure to Act Quickly: 

    • Scammers often create a sense of urgency or desperation to prompt victims to act impulsively without thoroughly considering the risks.

  • Requests for Money Upfront: 

    • Legitimate business transactions typically do not require victims to provide upfront payments or cover expenses before any profits are realised. Be cautious of any requests for advance fees or payments.

  • Unverified Claims: 

    • Verify the legitimacy of any claims made by individuals offering investment opportunities or financial assistance.

    • Questionable or unverifiable stories about illegal money, government officials, or secret transactions are often signs of a scam.

  • Lack of Transparency: 

    • Scammers may avoid providing clear and verifiable information about their identities, businesses, or the proposed transactions. 

    • Refusal to answer questions or provide documentation should raise suspicion.

  • Too Good to Be True Promises: 

    • Be sceptical of promises of unrealistically high returns on investment or large sums of money for minimal effort.

    • If an offer sounds too good to be true, it likely is.

 

Black money scammers often use various tactics to emotionally manipulate and traumatise their victims, exploiting their vulnerabilities and fears to maintain control over them.


  • Exploiting Hope: 

    • Scammers prey on victims' hopes and desires for financial security or prosperity.

    • They dangle the promise of quick and easy wealth, painting a tempting picture of a better future.

    • By fueling these hopes, scammers deepen their victims' emotional investment in the scam.

  • Creating Fear: 

    • Scammers instil fear in their victims by painting dire consequences if they do not comply with their demands.

    • They may threaten legal action, arrest, or physical harm, playing on victims' anxieties about their safety, reputation, or financial well-being.

    • The fear of these repercussions can induce panic and cloud victims' judgment.

  • Isolating Victims: 

    • Scammers often isolate their victims from friends, family, or other sources of support to maintain control over them.

    • They may discourage victims from seeking advice or assistance from others, convincing them that the scam is a confidential or sensitive matter.

    • By cutting off victims from external guidance, scammers deepen their emotional dependency.

  • Gaslighting: 

    • Gaslighting is a form of psychological manipulation in which the scammer undermines the victim's perception of reality, making them doubt their own judgment or sanity.

    • Scammers may distort facts, downplay concerns, or shift blame onto the victim, causing them to question their instincts and intuition.

    • This can lead to feelings of confusion, self-doubt, and emotional distress.

  • Exploiting Shame and Guilt: 

    • Scammers may exploit their victims' feelings of shame or guilt to coerce compliance.

    • They may accuse victims of being complicit in illegal activities or immoral behaviour, leveraging these accusations to manipulate their emotions and behaviour.

    • Victims may feel embarrassed or ashamed of their involvement in the scam, making them less likely to seek help or report the fraud.

  • Psychological Manipulation: 

    • Scammers employ various psychological tactics to exert control over their victims.

    • This can include love bombing (excessive flattery and affection), intermittent reinforcement (alternating between rewards and punishments), and cognitive dissonance (holding contradictory beliefs or attitudes).

    • These tactics can create confusion, dependency, and emotional turmoil in victims, making it difficult for them to break free from the scam.


By leveraging these emotional manipulation techniques, black money scammers exploit their victims' vulnerabilities

and inflict lasting emotional trauma. It's essential for individuals to recognize these tactics and seek support

if they suspect they have fallen victim to such scams.

 

By remaining vigilant and exercising caution when approached with unsolicited financial opportunities, individuals can protect themselves from falling victim to the Black Money Scam or similar fraudulent schemes.

 

Specialised Security Services invites the public to the Mike Bolhuis Daily Projects WhatsApp Group. This group is important in delivering insights into the latest crime trends, awareness, warnings and the exposure of criminals.


HOW TO JOIN THE MIKE BOLHUIS DAILY PROJECTS WHATSAPP GROUP:

  • Follow the link to our WhatsApp group:

  • "JOIN" to ensure you never miss our daily updates.

  • You will receive automatic notifications as soon as a new project is posted.

 
CONTACT MR MIKE BOLHUIS FOR SAFETY AND SECURITY MEASURES, PROTECTION, OR AN INVESTIGATION IF NEEDED.

ALL INFORMATION RECEIVED WILL BE TREATED IN THE STRICTEST CONFIDENTIALITY AND EVERY IDENTITY WILL BE PROTECTED.
 

Regards,

Mike Bolhuis

Specialist Investigators into

Serious Violent, Serious Economic Crimes & Serious Cybercrimes

PSIRA Reg. 1590364/421949

Mobile: +27 82 447 6116

Fax: 086 585 4924

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EXTREMELY IMPORTANT: All potential clients need to be aware that owing to the nature of our work as specialist investigators there are people who have been caught on the wrong side of the law - who are trying to discredit me - Mike Bolhuis and my organisation Specialised Security Services - to get themselves off the hook. This retaliation happens on social media and creates doubt about our integrity and ability. Doubt created on social media platforms is both unwarranted and untrue. We strongly recommend that you make up your minds concerning me and our organisation only after considering all the factual information - to the exclusion of hearsay and assumptions. Furthermore, you are welcome to address your concerns directly with me should you still be unsatisfied with your conclusions. While the internet provides a lot of valuable information, it is also a platform that distributes a lot of false information. The distribution of false information, fake news, slander and hate speech constitutes a crime that can be prosecuted by law. Your own research discretion and discernment are imperative when choosing what and what not to believe.


STANDARD RULES APPLY: Upon appointment, we require a formal mandate with detailed instructions. Please take note that should you not make use of our services – you may not under any circumstance use my name or the name of my organisation as a means to achieve whatever end.


POPI ACT 4 of 2013 South Africa: Mike Bolhuis' "Specialised Security Services" falls under Section 6 of the act. Read more here: https://mikebh.link/fntdpv

 
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